The Costs and Benefits of Nurse Turnover: A Business Case for Nurse Retention

raspberry_turnovers2

This is not a nursing turnover.

When nurses leave a facility, this research says:

  • “costs of nurse turnover have reported results ranging from about $22,000 to over $64,000 (U.S.) per nurse turnover”
  • “Turnover costs, in general, have been estimated to range between 0.75 to 2.0 times the salary of the departing individual”

The cost to facilities also includes:

  • Advertising and recruitment
  • Vacancy costs (e.g., paying for agency nurses, overtime, closed beds, hospital diversions, etc.)
  • Hiring
  • Orientation and training
  • Decreased productivity
  • Termination
  • Potential patient errors, compromised quality of care
  • Poor work environment and culture, dissatisfaction, distrust
  • Loss of organizational knowledge
  • Additional turnover

The real questions are:

Is there really a nursing shortage?

Do facilities assess and measure nurse retention?

Do they conduct exit interviews to find out why nurses leave?

Do employers attempt to address issues that affect low morale?

What is the average amount of experience for the nurses at that facility?

Are employers even asking these questions?

Here is the original research article:

http://nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/ANAMarketplace/ANAPeriodicals/OJIN/TableofContents/Volume122007/No3Sept07/NurseRetention.aspx

   

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Fun with Spanish Flu Myths

spanishflum

(author note: this pic is from a photo archive of Spanish Flu victims. One of the dangerous aspects of this epidemic is that it could kill within hours, even a young, healthy subject.)

https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/fun-with-spanish-flu-myths/

This article explores the 1918-1919 Spanish Flu Epidemic. It offers some historical, medical, and social insight on one of the most virulent strains of pathogens to take down a significant portion of the population.  Apparently, the battle against misinformation is an on-going one.

Checking In With My 19 Followers

For those of you, on the edge of your seat, following my blog; the lull you have been experiencing has been the result of finishing up the latest semester towards my BSN. Working full time, along with managing fatherly and husbandly duties, has kept me from sharing my mundane observations with the blogging world. I am in the process of signing up for my next class. I have also decided to pursue my Critical Care Nursing Certification. I hope to sit for that test this Fall. I have added a picture of nurses studying to emphasize my recent academic pursuits.

Are nurse’s all that and a bag of chips?

I have been a RN for 11 years now, have seen much as many of you have. One thing that continues to irk me are nurses that think because they are a nurse are somehow a cross between Florence

Source: Are nurse’s all that and a bag of chips?

 

I have to agree. There are some in the nursing field that are, in my terms, high on their own fumes.  It is apparent with the existence of things like novelty t-shirts that support such arrogance.  I will have to add some of the examples later.  I became a nurse because I wanted to care for others.  I worked hard to get where I am, but I am not looking for external validation – nor do I feel compelled to remind those around me of the work as some sort of self-sacrifice that others need to acknowledge in front of me.