Scrubs Magazine | 12 Things You Can Do At End Of Your Shift

Shutterstock | Volt Collection

Other than the “leave them with a song,” I would agree with this list.

 

http://scrubsmag.com/12-things-you-can-do-at-the-end-of-your-shift-to-help-the-incoming-nurses/

Advertisements

Finding A Workplace That Does Not Suck Series Concept #1: Team building

I was sitting at the nurse station on my unit when my boss walked by after interviewing a potential addition to our quirky team. All of us introduced ourselves and sent good wishes toward their

Source: Work Families: Where Nursing Shines

Finding A Workplace That Does Not Suck Series Concept #1: Team building

This article resonated with me. Actually, it got me thinking.  I would agree that work families are emotionally possible, but they have to be cultivated….and can be shaped by the people that are on the team. People can be outgoing, shy, intellectual, snarky, sarcastic, etc.  Everyone brings something to the workplace table.  As long as there is good communication, the team will grow.  The subsequent trust and commitment will make the workplace enjoyable and meaningful.  That can make a great shift fun, and a difficult shift bearable.

However, the team needs to bond organically. It can’t be forced.  Perhaps stating the obvious, but years in a variety of jobs over the years tells me that it isn’t obvious to some….namely, employers.  Unfortunately, businesses and corporations want all of the benefits of the teamwork – but are not aware of/understand/nor care about creating the environment to support a team. No, it’s not boring meetings. No, it’s not getting low-budget bling (lanyards, water bottles, etc.) with corporate logos on them.  More often than not, bosses paraphrase the empty parental solution to siblings that aren’t getting along:

“I want you all to get along. I don’t care how you do it.”

That ranks up there with “don’t make me come back there” and “I will turn this car around and we will go STRAIGHT home!” These statements remind me of my  childhood memories of sitting in a large, light blue Ford station wagon barreling down a distant highway during the 1970s.  We learn, at an early age, the difference between a real and empty threat.  The surface truce with siblings could be masked in front of the parents, but the resentment over such trivial things as this-is-my-side-of-the-car-and-thats-your-side arguments did not fade as easily.  The same can be true of co-workers. One moment, they can be civil and stand-offish to outwardly hostile.  This is what is known as “drama.” It exists, to some extent, in all workplaces.  At high levels, the drama can be as stifling as someone seriously ripping a fart in the med room.  This spontaneous analogy being obvious.  You don’t want to be there, but you have to be.

The synergistic power of having a great team of people is incredible.  As a nurse (extending to any medical field, I suppose), it is even more important.  We face very intense moments that require us to focus, assess, and act on our training, skill sets, and emotional resources to keep our patients safe and healthy.  Research identifies the negative emotions as impeding our ability to provide safe care. When our managers and coworkers function as resources and support; we can maximize our care.  However, when the work environment leaves you feeling alone and overwhelmed; you don’t have enough emotional resources left to be the best nurse/worker you can be.

The bottom line: Regardless of the source of your motivation to work, if you don’t want to be there; it is likely time to move on and work somewhere else.

For Hospitals, High Quality Care And Success Depend On The Happiness Of Nursing Staff

Nurses are the lifeblood of a hospital; now there’s just a study to prove it.

Source: For Hospitals, High Quality Care And Success Depend On The Happiness Of Nursing Staff

Author note: I would love to see the data that supports this statement in the article:

“Magnet hospitals are also known as exemplary health care systems, recognized by the American Nurses Credentialing Center as a great place for nurses to work.”

I will have to do some research. Please feel free to add sources in the comments.

Top 10 Things That I Love About Nursing

Image1

10) Patient Education –  I have always wanted to be a teacher.  As it turns out, nursing includes quite a bit of that.  The good news is that the audience is only patients and/or their families, instead of 35 bored, distracted teenagers.

9) Patient Advocacy – There is something very empowering about being the voice of a patient, especially one that is not able to speak up for themselves.

8) Teamwork – There is something very synergistic about working with others, especially if there is a good sense of teamwork.  Coworkers go beyond being other people at work.  They become friends (or work family, at times) and everyone looks out for each other.  The support and encouragement from them can give you more energy to get through a rough shift, as well as make an smoother shift seem even better.  It is also empowering to be able to share insight and discuss how to manage new issues as they arise.  Unfortunately, not all employers provide and/or maintain this kind of environment. Sometimes, you have to work to find them.

7) Scrubs – Having spent decades in the corporate world, I can speak from experience that dress clothes and neckties suck.  Scrubs rock.

6) Improved Time Management Skills – The constant practice of assessing the situation, available resources, and knowing how long it takes to complete a task carries over into my personal life.  Juggling family demands, as well as academic and social demands seems easier, if that makes any sense.

5) Confidence – I am far from being an experienced or expert nurse, but I have faced down some fairly emergent situations that do provide some perspective on what it means to be in a crisis.

4) Doing Something Meaningful – Some people look to make a difference in the world. It is not a requirement, but when applicable, can add an extra layer of satisfaction.

3) Respect – Nurses rank as the most respected and most trusted profession.  I chose nursing because of the overwhelming desire to take care of others.  However, it is nice that I am in a profession that is respected.  It can be troubling, and sometimes annoying when new acquaintances (and even strangers) solicit me for my medical opinion.  A cashier at a gas station, one morning, started rambling on about changing medications. I did not know her.  I just wanted to finish my drive home to get some sleep.  I told her to ask her primary care physician.

2) Evidence-based practice – Anything a nurse does is based on evidence-based practice. In other words, nurses study an issue…..do research….test the findings….then use that data to shape our practice.  Not only does science rock, nurses use it to support their work.

1)Plenty of opportunities to learn – There are so many aspects and layers to nursing that the learning process is always on-going.  Our profession requires continuing education credits, but there is always formal training at work (on-line/in-person classes) as well as informal training (getting a patient with an illness/injury that you’ve never seen before).  For those of us who pursue more education, there are always classes toward a bachelors, masters, or even doctorate.

Did I Mention That I Love Being A Nurse?

showt1

It was a rough week at work.  Patient assignments can vary, but sometimes the acuity level of the patients can elude the numbers generated on paper.  At the end of a few 12 hour shifts in a row, I felt like my body and brain were steamrollered. Luckily, I work with a great team. Nursing seriously rocks.

Setting Unrealistic (Medical) Expectations

backsurgg

Laser Spine Institute Commercial

Being in the medical field, I take care of wide range of patients….including those with joint and spinal problems.  Pain not only can make doing everyday tasks difficult; it can also be difficult to manage.  Sometimes, pain management is finding the right combination of the type of pain medicine, physical therapy, and even other non-invasive procedures.  Surgery can be an option, but it shouldn’t be the first choice.  Doctors are required to present patients with information about what the surgical procedure is, what the possible benefits are, what the risks are, and what to expect afterwards.  There is ALWAYS a risk with surgery.  It can happen for any number of reasons, including allergic reactions or extrapyramidal responses to medicine, comorbidities with the patient, or any complication during the procedure.  Every person is different; therefore, their response to the medicines, treatment, and surgery can be different, as well. Here is where I begin to have a problem with commercials with the Laser Spine Institute.  It presents all of the benefit with none of the risk. Setting expectations really high….unrealistically high, in my opinion.

I found one website that gives patient reviews about the organization. Granted, I am not completely sure of the credibility of the website….or those who present any information about it.  I am not gullible enough to believe that any presence of data on the Internet means it is true. I also found a Bloomberg Business article about lawsuits against Laser Spine Institute, so I would think there may be more credibility with this information. I will leave it up to the reader to check its veracity of its statements.

Speaking of veracity of its statements, I am reminded of a similar “rosy picture” painted by commercials produced by the Cancer Treatment Centers of America.  I have read articles that say that their success rates are heavily influenced by not taking on patient cases that may have more serious, more aggressive forms of cancer (that may not be as likely to survive).  Quoting a Doctor interviewed for an article from Reuters News Service that Iinked to:

Accepting only selected patients and calculating survival outcomes from only some of them “is a huge bias and gives an enormous advantage to CTCA,” said biostatistician Donald Berry of MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.

This is more than just a nurse pointing out nonsensical responses to medical crises on Grey’s Anatomy (Don’t get me started!). This is irresponsibility among those whose motives are financially-oriented that patient-driven.

 

 

 

 

Exploring The Apocalypse: Disaster Types

heck1

(I couldn’t find any good apocalypse photos, so I used this one I found in my scrapbook that captures my experience from high school. )

For those of you who have been following my blog, I have already shared some initial thoughts about Doomsday Preppers (who are waiting for when the SHTF).  Rather than wallow in depressive hopelessness, I want to explore the issues in an academic manner.  I think there are some things that aren’t being taken into consideration, like what we may actually face versus what we can prepare for.

The types of disasters, according to the U.S. Federal Government, include: biological, chemical, drought, earthquake, fire, flood, heat, hurricane, nuclear, tornado, tsunami, volcano, wildfires, and winter storm. Most of these appear to be natural disasters, so the scale isn’t necessarily global. Many of these are globally-specific threats, as well. Volcanos are dependent on proximity to tectonic plate borders. Hurricanes and tornadoes are heavily mitigated by mountainous areas, and more likely to roam in flatter topographical areas. Tsunamis are limited to coastal areas; just like flooding will be limited to those near rivers and streams. Flooding, just as wildfires and droughts are fairly cyclical – and occur naturally. Winter storms, as well as heat, are seasonal (and conditional) threats. This leaves us with chemical, biological, and nuclear.

Chemical threats would include mismanagement of the resources we already use. It isn’t necessarily something triggered by terrorists.  Taking illegally dumped chemicals out of the equation for the moment, we have countless chemical plants used in a variety of uses all around us.  We also have industrial chemicals in our environment already. For example, the natural gas industry pumps a liquid, deep into the ground to shatter rock which allows them to collect the gas.  This process called ‘fracking’ already poses a threat to our global environment. The BBC wrote an article to identify what fracking is and the controversies around it, including pumping carcinogenic compounds into our water tables. A USA Today article points out that a Duke University study shows increases radioactive materials in the water table, as a result of fracking. Let’s not forget to mention that there are many other nasty chemicals, according to this New York Times magazine article. My point is that the chemical threats are already here. It won’t necessarily be some external threat.  We have our own home-grown people who may have some ideations to initiate “end times” by sabotaging such places. There are also businesses that have used oils and hydraulic fluids, concentration of heavy metals, acids, and other caustic chemicals on premises. Those chemicals are also just an accident away from exposing us, too.

Nuclear threats are real, too. Again, it is already integrated into our society.  Bad guys don’t have to run to the store to pick-up radioactive material or have it shipped into the country. It is here already.  Yucca Mountain is one such place, but used radioactive material is stored in nearly every state in the United States – as seen here on this Federal Government website.  These are highly secured areas, but are just as subject to accidents – as well as any potential home-grown threats.  The Federal Government has many resources, including this page on potential nuclear fallout from our current nuclear reactors. While the dropping of nuclear bombs on Nagasaki and Hiroshima in the 1940s provided a great deal of data about radiation fallout, sickness, and radii of contamination; there is still a hypothetical element to any potential future radioactive events – which include weather systems, topography, water table, as well as the amount and time that exposure occurs.  All of these factors will shape the intensity of radiation sickness one might experience, which is a public group. Radiation sickness is also documented on Federal Government websites, too. I have a feeling that if a wide-scale nuclear disaster were to occur; a Pinterest-inspired bug out bag and stockpile may not really change the  drastically horrible outcomes that would follow.

Biological threats would not be limited to man-made ones.  We are in the middle of many battles within a wide-range war with microorganisms, as we speak.  MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) is one such potential threat. VRE (Vancomycin-resistant enterococci) is another. Yet another, newly emerging threat is CRE (Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae) explained on a governmental website.  These “superbugs” have developed a resistance to powerful medications, which means that they pose a threat – especially once they become pathogenic. In other words, once these “germs” cause illness – we are in serious trouble.  The same Darwinistic ability to adapt to their environment that humans have is shared with other organisms. Our environment poses a threat to a living organism. Some die. Some survive. Those that do, pass on their ability to survive that threat – or, at least provide some level of protection from that environmental condition. We have created a pattern of make a drug/see resistance appear to it as an on-going cycle. That has brought us to this point. However, I have seen a TED TALK from a molecular biologist named Bonnie Bassler that discusses “quorum sensing” which is how microorganisms chemically “talk” amongst themselves to function. I am not sure where this stands on the experimental process, as the talk was in 2009. It does sound promising.  The bottom line is that this threat is, again, a natural one.  Once again, natural recurrence of microorganistic threats are cyclical – as documented at this Federal Governmental website.  Even with the knowledge of standard precautions to prevent the spread of infection, things could get ugly very quickly – depending on the germ, exposure, and how it is managed.

I would also add that a power grid failure, or collapse of our network that provides power to everyone would be another cause for potentially apocalyptic conditions.  A few years ago, we all experienced large regional outages that cause quite a disruption of our lives.  There was a cascading effect where one site failed, which then led to other sections failing.  The talk was that our power grid is outdated and piecemealed together, and needed serious upgrades. Unfortunately, the “out of sight, out of mind” mentality has kept that issue out of the spotlight.  Have we taken our access to electricity for granted (not granite, people) that we are assuming that it won’t fail? Or that we can pick up the pieces fast enough when it crashes again?  If it were to fail, our whole infrastructure would follow in the collapse.  Our commerce, our businesses, our economy, our ability to communicate, our livelihood, our wealth……everything lost without access, once the power goes out.  Our data on our harddrives, documents, etc. Gone. I would think that our ability to travel would be lost, as well.  Power is needed to pump fuel from the ground, yes? People can’t get around. Goods can’t be moved. And, once again, a few days supply of water/food/stuff may not ultimately help. Somehow, the acronym “SHTF” will likely fall short of what we can expect from such an event. It could be a chain reaction that makes the apocalypse a long, drawn out event. We will be ultimately left to survive off the land, shaped by the catastrophic events that lay before us.

This is shaping my views of doomsday prepping to more of a “embrace the chaos” plan.  I can hope my family will be around each other when such an event occurs. For there, we would have to figure out what our assets and liabilities are.  Not a pleasant thing to consider, but seemingly more real.

Peace out.