The Costs and Benefits of Nurse Turnover: A Business Case for Nurse Retention

raspberry_turnovers2

This is not a nursing turnover.

When nurses leave a facility, this research says:

  • “costs of nurse turnover have reported results ranging from about $22,000 to over $64,000 (U.S.) per nurse turnover”
  • “Turnover costs, in general, have been estimated to range between 0.75 to 2.0 times the salary of the departing individual”

The cost to facilities also includes:

  • Advertising and recruitment
  • Vacancy costs (e.g., paying for agency nurses, overtime, closed beds, hospital diversions, etc.)
  • Hiring
  • Orientation and training
  • Decreased productivity
  • Termination
  • Potential patient errors, compromised quality of care
  • Poor work environment and culture, dissatisfaction, distrust
  • Loss of organizational knowledge
  • Additional turnover

The real questions are:

Is there really a nursing shortage?

Do facilities assess and measure nurse retention?

Do they conduct exit interviews to find out why nurses leave?

Do employers attempt to address issues that affect low morale?

What is the average amount of experience for the nurses at that facility?

Are employers even asking these questions?

Here is the original research article:

http://nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/ANAMarketplace/ANAPeriodicals/OJIN/TableofContents/Volume122007/No3Sept07/NurseRetention.aspx

   

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Fun with Spanish Flu Myths

spanishflum

(author note: this pic is from a photo archive of Spanish Flu victims. One of the dangerous aspects of this epidemic is that it could kill within hours, even a young, healthy subject.)

https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/fun-with-spanish-flu-myths/

This article explores the 1918-1919 Spanish Flu Epidemic. It offers some historical, medical, and social insight on one of the most virulent strains of pathogens to take down a significant portion of the population.  Apparently, the battle against misinformation is an on-going one.