Finding A Workplace That Does Not Suck Series Concept #1: Team building

I was sitting at the nurse station on my unit when my boss walked by after interviewing a potential addition to our quirky team. All of us introduced ourselves and sent good wishes toward their

Source: Work Families: Where Nursing Shines

Finding A Workplace That Does Not Suck Series Concept #1: Team building

This article resonated with me. Actually, it got me thinking.  I would agree that work families are emotionally possible, but they have to be cultivated….and can be shaped by the people that are on the team. People can be outgoing, shy, intellectual, snarky, sarcastic, etc.  Everyone brings something to the workplace table.  As long as there is good communication, the team will grow.  The subsequent trust and commitment will make the workplace enjoyable and meaningful.  That can make a great shift fun, and a difficult shift bearable.

However, the team needs to bond organically. It can’t be forced.  Perhaps stating the obvious, but years in a variety of jobs over the years tells me that it isn’t obvious to some….namely, employers.  Unfortunately, businesses and corporations want all of the benefits of the teamwork – but are not aware of/understand/nor care about creating the environment to support a team. No, it’s not boring meetings. No, it’s not getting low-budget bling (lanyards, water bottles, etc.) with corporate logos on them.  More often than not, bosses paraphrase the empty parental solution to siblings that aren’t getting along:

“I want you all to get along. I don’t care how you do it.”

That ranks up there with “don’t make me come back there” and “I will turn this car around and we will go STRAIGHT home!” These statements remind me of my  childhood memories of sitting in a large, light blue Ford station wagon barreling down a distant highway during the 1970s.  We learn, at an early age, the difference between a real and empty threat.  The surface truce with siblings could be masked in front of the parents, but the resentment over such trivial things as this-is-my-side-of-the-car-and-thats-your-side arguments did not fade as easily.  The same can be true of co-workers. One moment, they can be civil and stand-offish to outwardly hostile.  This is what is known as “drama.” It exists, to some extent, in all workplaces.  At high levels, the drama can be as stifling as someone seriously ripping a fart in the med room.  This spontaneous analogy being obvious.  You don’t want to be there, but you have to be.

The synergistic power of having a great team of people is incredible.  As a nurse (extending to any medical field, I suppose), it is even more important.  We face very intense moments that require us to focus, assess, and act on our training, skill sets, and emotional resources to keep our patients safe and healthy.  Research identifies the negative emotions as impeding our ability to provide safe care. When our managers and coworkers function as resources and support; we can maximize our care.  However, when the work environment leaves you feeling alone and overwhelmed; you don’t have enough emotional resources left to be the best nurse/worker you can be.

The bottom line: Regardless of the source of your motivation to work, if you don’t want to be there; it is likely time to move on and work somewhere else.

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